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The Pennine Journey long-distance footpath traverses some of the most delightful terrain that northern England has to offer..

A Pennine Journey route mapStarting at Settle, the first two days pass through limestone country - which Alfred Wainwright described in his pictorial guide ‘Walks in Limestone Country’. After passing the immense Hull Pot –– below the slopes of one of the Three Peaks, Penyghent, and reputedly the largest hole in England - the route arrives at Buckden in Wharfedale. From the delights of Swaledale the route passes the highest public house in England, the Tan Hill Inn on Sleightholme Moor, before making its way into Bowes with its ruined castle. From Middleton-in-Teesdale a lovely walk along part of the River Tees is followed by crossing over into Weardale before reaching the medieval village of Blanchland. Soon, by way of Hexham with its magnificent Abbey, Hadrian’s Wall is reached – Alfred Wainwright’s 1938 objective. The route follows probably the best 20 miles of this World Heritage Site, with opportunities to delve into the history of the Roman occupation of Britain particularly at Housesteads.

From the ruins of Thirlwall Castle, near Greenhead, the route heads south, initially along the River South Tyne to Alston before climbing over the shoulder of Cross Fell, the highest point in England outside of Alfred Wainwright’s beloved Lakeland Fells. The Eden valley is followed to its source before the route crosses over to the River Rawthey bordering on countryside described in Alfred Wainwright’s ‘Walks on the Howgill Fells’. Bypassing the book town of Sedbergh the route goes into Dentdale before arriving back in limestone country in Ingleton after the ascent of one of the Three Peaks – Whernside. The final day from Ingleton sees the ascent of another of the Three Peaks, Ingleborough, before the journey ends back in Settle.

 
Route Section
Distance miles
Ascent - feet
Day 1
Settle to Horton
7.25
1,788
Day 2
Horton-in-Ribblesdale to Buckden
12.75
2,195
Day 3
Buckden to Gunnerside
17.50
2,851
Day 4
Gunnerside to Bowes
17.50
2,152
Day 5
Bowes to Middleton-in-Teesdale
12.50
1,634
Day 6
Middleton-in-Teesdale to Westgate
15.75
2,290
Day 7
Westgate to Blanchland
10.75
1,522
Day 8
Blanchland to Hexham
11.75
1,430
Day 9
Hexham to Housesteads
15.50
2,175
Day 10
Housesteads to Greenhead
9.75
1,526
Day 11
Greenhead to Alston
17.00
2,451
Day 12
Alston to Milburn
16.75
2,500
Day 13
Milburn to Appleby
8.25
771
Day 14
Appleby to Kirkby Stephen
16.00
1,585
Day 15
Kirkby Stephen to Garsdale
12.25
1,909
Day 16
Garsdale to Sedbergh
13.75
1,949
Day 17
Sedbergh to Ingleton
17.75
3,133
Day 18
Ingleton to Settle
14.25
3,081
 
Total:
247.00
36,942



"Give me a map to look, and I am content. Give me a map of country that I know, and I am comforted: I live my travels over again; step by step I recall the journeys I have made; half-forgotten incidents spring vividly to mind, and again I can suffer and rejoice at experiences which are once more made very real." AW in A Pennine Journey

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